A TOOLKIT FOR WELLBEING

When our environment changes, our bodies, minds and souls respond. Living with the pandemic costs energy – and nerves!  The activities in this toolkit can help manage stress and anxiety, and give your body and mind a chance to recharge. 

TOOLS TO REDUCE STRESS

FOR YOURSELF, OR WITH FRIENDS

FOR PARENTS & CHILDREN

BUILD RESILIENCE TOGETHER

HOW YOUR BODY MANAGES STRESS

Learn how biology influences our thoughts, feelings and decisions!

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Find out where you can turn for more help

IN A HURRY?
DOWNLOAD 8 FIRST AID STRATEGIES

Print out this poster (A3) or share it with friends:  8 quick, simple activities that kick-start your nervous system’s natural ability to regulate stress! 

We hope this toolkit will make it easier to speak up when you notice that you or someone close to you is feeling very stressed, anxious or exhausted. Asking each other “How are you, really?” is more important now than ever!

MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT

If you notice that you or someone you are close to is feeling very distressed, please remember: Asking for help is a sign of strength! Did you know that the ability to seek and accept help is a sign of resilience?

If you don’t know who to turn to in your community, please visit United for Global Mental Health’s website, where you will find a directory of helplines around the world. 

YOUR BUILT-IN RESILIENCE IS DOING ITS BEST!

 Dealing with the many changes how we live, work and play together costs an immense amount of energy. If you notice yourself feeling anxious, angry or hopeless, it’s important to know that these feelings are not a sign of weakness. They are normal responses to an extraordinary situation.  

The good news is: our bodies and minds are hard-wired for resilience. And there are lots of actions you can take to strengthen this build-in ability to care for yourself and others. In fact, you’re probably already doing quite a few things that you might not be aware of!

 

#WEAREalonetogether

This campaign is a joint project of the Peter Möhrle Foundation and the University of Hamburg Medical Center in cooperation with the Ehlerding foundation.